Lutheran Creation Doctrine: Old Earth Creationism

Hello! This week I am continuing in my study of the creation doctrine of the Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod. I introduced this new series two weeks ago; I’m following along a series of blog posts on the Concordia Theology blog studying old earth creationism, evolutionary creationism, and everyone’s favorite, young earth creationism. Which one will the Lutherans choose? Or will they make up a new narrative? Stay tuned to find out! Continue reading “Lutheran Creation Doctrine: Old Earth Creationism”

Lutheran Creation Doctrine: Introduction

As you may know, a while ago my pastor-in-law informed me and my fiance that he had found this blog. The following conversation was interesting, of course, but it probably went about as well as it could have. I took this opportunity of openly talking about our beliefs to ask him a few questions, as well. I’d always been under the impression that the Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod was a strict believer in young-earth creationism stemming from a literal interpretation of Genesis; this had actually been one of my biggest reasons for deciding I couldn’t accept its teachings or religion at all. Continue reading “Lutheran Creation Doctrine: Introduction”

Why Church Is a Scam

Since I was a little kid, I haven’t liked going to church. Since my teen years, I also haven’t believed much of what was preached to me there. For the time that I’ve been an active atheist, I’ve been disgusted about what’s taught at church and its effect on the world. But somehow it wasn’t until just recently that everything fell into place and I realized why church is the perfect formula to be a man-made money-making scheme. Church, to me, means traditional, doctrinally structured services within the Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod, but a lot of my apostate readers will relate, whether you were Catholic, Pentecostal, Methodist, or probably any other denomination, even nondenominational. Continue reading “Why Church Is a Scam”

Bible Study Notes: The Trinity

If you happen to be familiar with the church year, then you know that last week, June 11th, was Trinity Sunday. On Trinity Sunday, some Christian churches recite the Athanasian Creed, which is a thorough description of the immanent workings of the Triune God as well as the nature of Jesus as god and man. My church’s vicar, who is essentially acting as pastor while the pastor is away, gave the congregation the week following Trinity Sunday to submit any questions that we had about the Trinity so that he could address their questions in this week’s bible study. Continue reading “Bible Study Notes: The Trinity”

Playing with Fire

I had a post in mind that I was going to write for today, but something happened this morning that I instantly knew I would have to write about instead. I was sitting bored in church when the sermon started and the vicar began making remarks about “unbelievers” and the “secular world.” I immediately scrambled for a pencil and a paper, and I started taking notes.

If you’ve read my posts Bible Study Notes and God Works in Mysterious Ways, you might remember my discussions of the weird teachings of my church’s new pastor. Right now he’s away for a couple weeks as his wife has had or is about to have their eighth child Continue reading “Playing with Fire”

Bible Study Notes: The Fall

Last week, I wrote about an insane bible study lead by my church’s new pastor. As it turns out, this guy is a pot of gold when it comes to blog content. Having moved home for the summer yesterday, I’m in for quite a few more bible studies from him, and in terms of ridiculousness, today’s did not disappoint.

For a few years, I’ve been in the habit of taking notes during sermons and bible studies at church, simply out of sheer amazement of the unbelievable things that are often said. Continue reading “Bible Study Notes: The Fall”

God Works in Mysterious Ways

It is a common argument against Christian thought that scripture calls for us to not question God when he does something we do not understand. This can apply to times that God does not save those who are suffering, times in the bible in which Jesus performs miracles that are impossible in the natural physical world, or times when God does not answer prayers. Admitting that there is no way to comprehend God’s means or reasons for doing what he does is an easy way for Christians to come to terms with this cognitive dissonance, but I like to give them the benefit of the doubt. The majority of Christians that I’ve met are not stupid people. Some questionable logic is generally necessary for reconciling various fantastical claims in scripture that can clash with our reasonable, observable conclusions, but it doesn’t stop believers from doing their best to apply logic to these situations.

Continue reading “God Works in Mysterious Ways”

A Look at a Lutheran Doctrine

Some questions that atheists and skeptics are commonly asked are “Why do you only criticize certain religions?” or “What do you have against Christianity specifically?” For me, the answer is that Christianity is by far the most popular religion in the United States, and I see it everywhere, whether it is at home, at school, or out in public. Specifically, my family are members and leaders in different congregations of the Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod, or LCMS.

The LCMS is the second largest branch of the Lutheran Church, and it has almost 2.1 million baptized members (including me). I’ve grown up with the ultra-conservative LCMS teachings since I was a baby, but until about last week, I dared not read into the details of its doctrine. After reading for a while on Wikipedia, I came across A Brief Statement of the Doctrinal Position of the Missouri Synod, a concise but clear summary of LCMS teachings written by Franz August Otto Pieper in 1932. I want to highlight some sections of the Statement that thoroughly dumbfounded me and truly left me at a loss for words, especially knowing that my own family and many of our close friends actually believe these ideas. Continue reading “A Look at a Lutheran Doctrine”