An Atheist on Modesty

I’ve often seen that Christians, particularly young Christian girls, feel pressured to believe certain things about culture and about people in general. Don’t be friends with atheists, don’t participate in LGBT weddings, don’t drink like everybody else does. Probably the most common example I see, though, *cough cough* Girl Defined *cough cough* is that girls ought to be modest, and they should have a problem with immodesty. Continue reading “An Atheist on Modesty”

Apologetics 102: Conclusion

David Hogsette’s Emails to a Young Seeker is one of the most… fascinating books I’ve ever read. I first discovered this quirky apologetics book when I had to edit it as an assignment in a class at Grove City College—and not even a religion class, but an English class. Being the passive aggressive individual that I am, I decided that I had too many edits to be contained in one assignment, and I wanted my critique of the garbage presented to me at that school to be public. Continue reading “Apologetics 102: Conclusion”

Why Evolution is True Review

To date, I have reviewed five books on this blog. Of them all, this one is by far my favorite.

Jerry Coyne’s Why Evolution is True is the first book I’ve read cover-to-cover (in this genre) that does not focus on religion, either with a basis of defending it or exposing its downfalls. As the title might convey, the book is all about evidence for evolution and a bit of explanation on how it works. I’ve tried once before, actually, to read another book on evolution—one that you may have heard of. Continue readingWhy Evolution is True Review”

Apologetics 102: Theological Paradoxes

In the past, each of my posts critiquing Prof Dave Hogsette’s Emails to a Young Seeker has centered around four of five chapters, or fictional email exchanges between Prof Dave and a college student who does not exist. This post was meant to be split up into two, but a) I really hate reading this book and I am ready to be done with it, and b) splitting it up where I originally intended to would have been very awkward, because it didn’t turn out to be a good stopping point. What this means is that this post includes eight “exchanges”, although most of them are insanely repetitive, so I will try to be brief. Continue reading “Apologetics 102: Theological Paradoxes”

A Morning Routine Without Jesus

A while ago, I tried to write a post showing the absurdity that is my life by proposing a hypothetical situation in which the roles of Christianity and atheism were reversed. In order to express just how much Christianity was forced on me at school, I wanted to say, “Imagine being a closeted Christian who had to take classes on atheism, sing songs about atheism, read books on atheism, and attend atheist church.” Quickly, I realized that this entire situation is flawed because by nature, atheism doesn’t operate in the same way that religion does. Continue reading “A Morning Routine Without Jesus”

Letter to a Christian Nation Review

Atheists, often, are represented by those of us who are famous for their unbelief; namely, Richard Dawkins, Christopher Hitchens, Sam Harris, and Daniel Dennett. When atheists began to speak up against religion and it was classified and demonized as “new atheism”, these four men emerged at the forefront of the movement. For years now, it has been common for atheists to be generalized as belonging to the same ilk as these four men. As someone young in her atheistic studies, I’ve looked up to them for being so steadfast in their unbelief, so sure, and so well-versed. At this point, I’ve read books by three of the four of them, and I don’t know that they’re all they’ve been built up to be. Continue readingLetter to a Christian Nation Review”

My Atheist Bookshelf

When I moved into my dorm room to start my senior year of college last August, I went on a shopping spree of atheist books with which to fill my new bookshelf. At that point, I had eight atheist books and seven Christian books, and I had seven more atheist books coming in the mail from Thriftbooks (which I highly recommend: I bought seven books for $26!). Since then, my bookshelf has been slowly expanding through gifts from my fiance and romantic trips to used bookstores together on rainy Sunday afternoons, as well as random orders from Thriftbooks. I’ve only made it through four and a half books so far, but of course I accumulate more much faster than I read. Continue reading “My Atheist Bookshelf”

Reversing Pascal’s Wager

Pascal’s Wager is an extremely popular topic among atheists and theists alike. It’s an old argument that’s been refuted time and time again, by many people including three of my favorite atheist YouTubers, JaclynGlenn, CosmicSkeptic, and Rachel Oates. I’ve even briefly touched upon it before, here. On the off chance that you haven’t heard of it, Pascal’s Wager is a bargain of the existence of heaven and hell vs whether or not you ought to believe in God.

The old “wager” by Blaise Pascal can be summed up by this table: Continue reading “Reversing Pascal’s Wager”

Apologetics 101: Lesson 3

Hello and welcome to this week’s installment of The World’s Worst and Most Useless Class! If you’ve been following along in my Apologetics 101 series (here and here), then you’ll know that I signed up for this class to learn a thing or two about Christian apologetics and arguments for God that I could expect a Christian to use against me. You’ll also know that I’ve learned neither of these things. Actually, I’ve learned nothing. Continue reading “Apologetics 101: Lesson 3”