Lutheran Creation Doctrine: Introduction

As you may know, a while ago my pastor-in-law informed me and my fiance that he had found this blog. The following conversation was interesting, of course, but it probably went about as well as it could have. I took this opportunity of openly talking about our beliefs to ask him a few questions, as well. I’d always been under the impression that the Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod was a strict believer in young-earth creationism stemming from a literal interpretation of Genesis; this had actually been one of my biggest reasons for deciding I couldn’t accept its teachings or religion at all. Continue reading “Lutheran Creation Doctrine: Introduction”

The Story of Antony Flew

The first time I can recall ever hearing the name Antony Flew was in my college apologetics class. My crazy teacher, always trying to prove a point, had said something along the lines of “even this famous atheist, Antony Flew, changed his mind and now believes in God! That proves that God exists!” My inward reaction to this was twofold: I thought, “Well, then, he must not have been a very convinced atheist” and “That invalidates any atheistic arguments that this person must have had, because in the end he himself wasn’t even convinced by them.” Continue reading “The Story of Antony Flew”

Christians and Atheists: Seeing the Other Side

During my last week at college, I found myself perusing through various Christian girl YouTube channels (I watch a lot of YouTube, and I find myself watching that from time to time… don’t judge me). Some are really terrible and drive me nuts—I won’t name any names, but, well, one of the worst offenders rhymes with Shmirl Shmefined. But that week I actually watched a lot of videos from a Christian girl my age who I really liked and found myself being drawn to for how honest and down to earth she was. Continue reading “Christians and Atheists: Seeing the Other Side”

An Atheist on Modesty

I’ve often seen that Christians, particularly young Christian girls, feel pressured to believe certain things about culture and about people in general. Don’t be friends with atheists, don’t participate in LGBT weddings, don’t drink like everybody else does. Probably the most common example I see, though, *cough cough* Girl Defined *cough cough* is that girls ought to be modest, and they should have a problem with immodesty. Continue reading “An Atheist on Modesty”

Apologetics 102: Conclusion

David Hogsette’s Emails to a Young Seeker is one of the most… fascinating books I’ve ever read. I first discovered this quirky apologetics book when I had to edit it as an assignment in a class at Grove City College—and not even a religion class, but an English class. Being the passive aggressive individual that I am, I decided that I had too many edits to be contained in one assignment, and I wanted my critique of the garbage presented to me at that school to be public. Continue reading “Apologetics 102: Conclusion”

Why Evolution is True Review

To date, I have reviewed five books on this blog. Of them all, this one is by far my favorite.

Jerry Coyne’s Why Evolution is True is the first book I’ve read cover-to-cover (in this genre) that does not focus on religion, either with a basis of defending it or exposing its downfalls. As the title might convey, the book is all about evidence for evolution and a bit of explanation on how it works. I’ve tried once before, actually, to read another book on evolution—one that you may have heard of. Continue readingWhy Evolution is True Review”

No True Christian

Allow me to present to you a hypothetical situation. Let’s say I’ve just finished reading The Case for Christ. There was something about Lee Strobel’s ingenious and fool-proof arguments that has miraculously convinced me that Jesus exists, God exists, the bible is true, and I ought to become a Christian. Well then, what should I do next? Join a church? Get baptized? Stop drinking alcohol? Hang bible verses up on my walls? Should I love my neighbor, or should I become homophobic perhaps? There are so many options! Continue reading “No True Christian”

Apologetics 102: Theological Paradoxes

In the past, each of my posts critiquing Prof Dave Hogsette’s Emails to a Young Seeker has centered around four of five chapters, or fictional email exchanges between Prof Dave and a college student who does not exist. This post was meant to be split up into two, but a) I really hate reading this book and I am ready to be done with it, and b) splitting it up where I originally intended to would have been very awkward, because it didn’t turn out to be a good stopping point. What this means is that this post includes eight “exchanges”, although most of them are insanely repetitive, so I will try to be brief. Continue reading “Apologetics 102: Theological Paradoxes”

A Morning Routine Without Jesus

A while ago, I tried to write a post showing the absurdity that is my life by proposing a hypothetical situation in which the roles of Christianity and atheism were reversed. In order to express just how much Christianity was forced on me at school, I wanted to say, “Imagine being a closeted Christian who had to take classes on atheism, sing songs about atheism, read books on atheism, and attend atheist church.” Quickly, I realized that this entire situation is flawed because by nature, atheism doesn’t operate in the same way that religion does. Continue reading “A Morning Routine Without Jesus”

Apologetics 102: An Introduction

I’m finally going to start a new series that I’ve been so excited to share on here for over a month, which is…. more apologetics! Rather than taking another class, I’m going to be looking at an apologetics book written by a professor from my college. I decided that it was so bad that I would review and critique it as I went along instead of one long review at the end of the book, which I usually do. Continue reading “Apologetics 102: An Introduction”